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Hope: How Yoga Heals the Scars of Trauma

We are pleased to announce the arrival of a new and important book on how yoga heals trauma by Swami Ahimsadhara (Helen Cushing).  Swami Ahimsadhara will teach a course on this topic through Big Shakti’s education platform in 2017. (Register your interest below).

Yoga for Trauma Recovery

Yoga is a powerful and efficient system for changing the brain. This is exactly the need of people suffering from post-traumatic disorder (PTSD). Not all trauma survivors develop PTSD but for those who do, life becomes unbearable, just as the trauma was. Devoid of hope, suicide can feel like the only way to freedom from physical pain and mental anguish. Yoga offers a vital seed of hope.

Although PTSD is generally treated as a psychological disorder it is increasingly recognised as a condition of the entire organism. Hence, body inclusive therapy has an important role to play in full recovery. The need is to heal the nervous system, reset the brain and learn methods for relaxation, mind management and putting the past to rest. As the symptoms of PTSD reduce it becomes possible to re-establish fulfilling relationships with loved ones and interact comfortably with society.

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The Definition and Meaning Of Love

Have you wondered about the definition of love? Can you define love?  Do you know the meaning of love? I sure have thought about love. So much so that I invited a few of my brave and emotionally articulate friends to be part of a little experimental video – Love Is. They each do a brilliant job of defining the elusive, wondrous nature and meaning of love.  

This short video, LOVE IS. was made over two decades ago, but love is eternal, as is the wisdom and generosity of those who appear in this video. May it delight and inspire you to contemplate your own definitions and feelings about love…

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How to Prosper and Succeed in the Year of the Fire Monkey

2016 Year Of The Fire Monkey

The year of the Fire Monkey starts February 8, 2016. Fire Monkey rewards those who are agile, inventive, quick-witted, sociable, creative and community conscious. Here’s how you can prosper, succeed, and make the most of the natural Fire Monkey energies of 2016.

Think like a clever trickster more than a serious martyr

Work a little smarter, not a lot harder.

Resist the auto-response, “I’m so busy” when someone asks how you are. The subtext; “I’m so boring” is a conversation killer.

Tell others about your fun and freedoms even if they’re minuscule. They’re inspiring and inviting.

Bend your brain

If you’re over 40 and haven’t studied something new and challenging in the last decade your brain has seriously decayed.

Something new and challenging means more than reading a new book.

Be like a child again, trying to grasp an alien concept for the first time. Every time your brain strains, you’ll grow ten brain cells.

Find your folk

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3 Minute Meditation to Glimpse What You Really Want and to Sleep Better

When you think of all the things you want, your list could be thousands of items long. When you feel what you want, you’re more likely to have only a few things that really matter to you.

This simple meditation can be used to quickly cut through the confusion and can also help you go to sleep, especially if you do a lot of thinking in bed.

Meditation to see what your heart wants, quickly.

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Bring Your Light Forth & Yogic Gifts

May the duality of life ease its relentless division and the 10,000 things become one.
May you abide in Tao, with one eye looking inward and one eye looking out upon the world.
May you believe in the dream as much as you do in reality.
May you know that spirit is heart and heart is spirit.
May you strive for Yoga; union, connection, grace.
May you bring your light forth.
Shine, for yourself and for the world.

       Jayne Stevenson

Yogic Gifts + 20% Coupon Code

We are pleased to offer you a 20% Coupon Code: Yogic
Valid until midnight 13th December on all Big Shakti Products

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The Convenience Virus

Fast And Easy Is The Measure Of Our Time

Are you running urgently from task to task and place to place with a desire to do life faster and easier? Perhaps you’ve caught the convenience virus.

The convenience virus can get under your skin. Like a rash you can’t soothe, it will spread throughout your life if you don’t rein it in.

Fast and easy is the measure of our time

Convenience ideology gained popularity when advertisers and product designers of the 1950s teamed up to create an insatiable desire for labour-saving “mod-cons,” such as kitchen appliances. It surged again in the 90s, capturing our imaginations with rapid progress in electronics, computing, consuming, and communicating. It just keeps on growing and going.

Convenience ideology propels the evolution of design and changes how we live, survive, prosper, fit in and interact.

We all want convenient ways to perform menial tasks, but a lack of discernment around our desire for convenience is a real danger. If we allow our desire for fast and easy to bleed into every aspect of our lives, including our health and wellbeing, creativity, and spirituality, we drain our life force. We lose patience with the most important parts of ourselves.

The growing aversion to experience, learning and creating

From grade schools to universities, teachers are increasingly complaining about their students’ desire to escape the learning process entirely. Thinking is too laborious and slow for many students. They have an urgent need to know, without a willingness to fully experience and explore their subjects.

I recently read an astounding interview with a University philosophy professor who said his students did not want to study. That’s right; his philosophy students reported that they didn’t have time to read books on philosophy. These students had become so used to consuming short bursts of information that they pressured him to cull his reading list down to just a few “essential” books.

The professor reluctantly gave the students his shortlist, which cut his original list by half. A week later, they began to ask exactly which passages they should read. The students said they didn’t have time to read the entire shortlist, or, as it turned out, even a single book.

This story reflects many of our current attitudes:

  • Why should I practice when I can get qualified, anyway?
  • Why get experience when I can have success without it?
  • Why seek knowledge when information is available on the topic? (What is knowledge? Isn’t it just information that you hold in your head? Why bother when I’ve got Google?)
  • Why develop new skills when I learned them at school?
  • Why create something when I can buy it?
  • Why get my hands dirty and sweaty, fumble, and make mistakes?

Here’s why.

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